Two VISICORT PIs involved in new COST Action

Our PI Prof Thomas Ritter of the National University of Ireland Galway attended the kick-off meeting in Brussels of the COST Action Aniridia-NET: networking to address an unmet medical, scientific, and societal challenge. Aniridia is a devastating ocular disease that requires intensive eye care, social and community support from birth and throughout an individual’s lifetime.

Although a rare disease, aniridia is associated with ocular surface pathology such as dry eye, inflammation, stem cell insufficiency, nerve degeneration, and vascularization – problems common to many ocular surface pathologies collectively affecting large populations. Greater collaboration and sharing of information and resources in the area of aniridia is therefore additionally expected to have significant benefits for the treatment of larger patient populations with ocular surface disease.

Two VISICORT PIs, Thomas Ritter and Jesper Hjortdal of Aarhus University Hospital are on the management committee of this project.

Learn more about this COST action CA 18116 here: https://bit.ly/2P6GTU3

Partners at CCMI offer training workshops

Our partners at the Centre for Cell Manufacturing Ireland (CCMI) based at the National University of Ireland Galway have organized a workshop series:  “Selection, Validation and Implementation of Rapid Microbiological Methods for ATMPs“. This event will take place in Galway, Ireland on the 12th and 13th of June 2019.

For more information, download the flyer here.

VISICORT PI Prof John Armitage, University of Bristol has been awarded an OBE in the Queen’s New Year Honours

Professor John Armitage, Emeritus Professor of Cryobiology in the Bristol Medical School and former Director of Bristol Tissue Bank, has been awarded an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) for his services to corneal transplantation.

With a PhD in cardiac cryopreservation, Professor Armitage set up the Bristol Eye Bank with Professor David Easty, then Head of Ophthalmology, and Professor Ben Bradley, former Medical Director of UK Transplant.

Since 1986 the Bristol Eye Bank has been a leader in corneal preservation and supply for transplantation around the UK, growing to become one of the largest of similar initiatives across Europe. Within the UK this transformed corneal transplantation from an out-of-hours emergency procedure to an elective operation that could be planned weeks in advance.

Professor Armitage, now part of the NHS, continues to lead research into corneal transplant outcomes and transplant immunology through the University of Bristol.

Speaking about his award, John commented: ‘I am truly delighted to have my work recognised in this way. The award also reflects the impact of the work by the Bristol Eye Bank and recognises the collective effort of Bristol University staff, ophthalmology colleagues in the Bristol Eye Hospital and collaborating organisations including NHS Blood and Transplant and the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. However, above all, I must acknowledge the thoughtfulness and generosity of the families of eye donors, without whom tissue and organ transplantation would not be possible.’

More details can be found at: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2018/december/john-armitage.html